Sunday, February 27, 2011

The Forgotten Rank - Scout

Today I talk about the rank of Scout. Also called "Joining Requirements", this rank has been so downsized that it's not even listed with the rest of the rank advancements in the Scout Handbook. It's still a real rank, though. It's got a patch and everything. They call it "Joining Requirements" now, but I have yet to have a scout join my troop who has these things finished. They're not that hard to complete, but they can hardly be assumed. Even for Webelos that are bridging.

For those who don't know what I'm talking about, the "Joining Requirements" are found on page 17 of the 2010 Scout Handbook. Here is the list of requirements:

  1. Meet the age requirements. Be a boy who is 11 years old, or one who has completed the fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old.

  2. Find a Scout troop near your home.

  3. Complete a Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian.

  4. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance.

  5. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake.

  6. Demonstrate tying the square knot (a joining knot).

  7. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or Promise, Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code.

  8. Describe the Scout badge.

  9. Complete the Pamphlet Exercises. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent's Guide".

  10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference.


The main difference that I see between this rank and "regular" ranks is that there isn't a board of review required for Scout. Whether you agree with me or not, let's just continue on the premise that the bulk of these requirements need to be covered/taught at a meeting in some way and move forward.


I teach all of these requirements in one meeting. It's kind of cool to be able to tell a brand-new Scout that he's finished a rank after one meeting. All of these requirements are very well explained in the Scout Handbook, but I'll walk through and give my two bits as an addendum for each. I'm ignoring the first two which are, obviously, handled before coming into the group.


  1. Complete a Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian. - Ensure that this has happened. It doesn't involve the Scout, but it's a critical piece of paperwork that MUST happen. Nothing the Scout completes can be counted towards advancement until this is done. I tell the parents to submit it at the Scout office themselves so that no one but them can be blamed if it doesn't happen. Plus I'm a lazy procrastinator who would put it off if it were left up to me.

  2. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance. - Pretty basic. We do this every meeting. The big thing I do is listen for Scouts saying "I pledge of allegiance" when we do our openings. I get a lot of Scouts doing that for some reason. I had one who insisted his teacher at school taught him that way. I truly hope that he's wrong...

  3. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake. - Most every Scout I get knows how to do these things. I mainly focus on the concept of standing at attention and looking sharp as you do the sign and salute rather than doing them sloppily.

  4. Demonstrate tying the square knot (a joining knot). - The Scout Handbook has a pretty decent illustration of how to tie a square knot. The big thing they don't show is an example of the most common incorrect knot tied when attempting a square knot. It's called a granny knot. Compare that image to a valid square knot and hopefully you can see the difference.

  5. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or Promise, Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code. - I go through and talk about the meaning of the various parts of each of these items. In my opinion this also passes off Tenderfoot requirement #7. The Scout Handbook has great explanations for these.

  6. Describe the Scout badge. - I have a diagram of the Scout Badge scanned from an older copy of the Scout Handbook that has all of the pieces numbered. I use the descriptions right out of the book, though.

  7. Complete the Pamphlet Exercises. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent's Guide". - I used to gloss over this one as something handled by the parents. Primarily, because it makes me uncomfortable to talk about the topic with 11 year olds. Given the BSA's increased focus on youth protection lately I've decided to swallow my discomfort and address the issue. I'm not perfect at discussing it, but at least I am discussing it, which is a start.

  8. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. - I just assume that the entire meeting counts for this and move on.


There you go, easy as pie the first rank on the trail to Eagle is finished.

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